Rain in Burbank

A woman tries to avoid the rain and water popping up from a drain on San Fernando Blvd. near Magnolia Blvd. in Burbank on Friday, Feb. 28, 2014. Rain is predicted through the weekend. (Raul Roa / Staff Photographer / March 1, 2014)

Southern California braced for more rain -- and possible tornadoes and thunderstorms -- Saturday afternoon from a powerful Pacific storm that earlier prompted evacuations in several fire-ravaged hillside communities, the Los Angeles Times reports. 

Those areas so far have managed to escape any major damage, but mandatory evacuation orders remained in place for parts of Glendora, Monrovia and Azusa. Early Saturday mud from an unstable hillside in Azusa oozed into the backyard of one home.

Los Angeles County Fire Capt. Brian Jordan told the Los Angeles Times that local emergency agencies were standing by in the event of a major mudslide.

"We have more than 100 firefighters, bulldozers amd search-and-rescue teams" in the area, Jordan said.

All 26 homes on Ridge View Drive in Azusa remained under evacuation, according to Azusa police Sgt. Sam Fleming. The hillsides behind the homes there were denuded in the 2,000-acre Colby fire last month that destroyed five homes.

The National Weather Service predicted heavy rains and some thunderstorms throughout the region Saturday afternoon, with intermittent showers through Sunday. High surf advisories were issued, with waves up to 12 feet and some coastal flooding expected through Sunday.

Several rain-related traffic accidents with injuries were reported overnight, including a multicar crash in which a woman was killed on the 110 Freeway shortly after 2 a.m., authorities said.

Bands of rain have dumped 7.88 inches of precipitation on Mount Wilson since the storm arrived late last week, according to Ryan Kittell of the National Weather Service.

By 10 a.m. Saturday rainfall totals had reached 3.35 inches in downtown Los Angeles, 4.65 inches in Newhall in the Santa Clarita Valley and 3.27 inches in Canoga Park in the San Fernando Valley, according to the weather service.

The highest amount was recorded at Camp Ophids in the San Gabriel Mountains above Pasadena, which received at total of 9.59 inches, including 3.22 in the last 24 hours, Kittell said.

-- Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times

Follow Jean on Twitter: @jeanmerl

RELATED:

Rain causes havoc in Burbank area

Rain hits hard, but few incidents in Glendale

Officials report storm conditions 'calm' in La Cañada