Religion

In Theory: Do children of faith have more difficulty differentiating between fact and fiction?

A study published this month in the journal Cognitive Science and reported by the Huffington Post shows that young children exposed to religion find it more difficult to differentiate between fact and fiction than do their peers being reared in secular households. The study's authors write that 5- and 6-year-olds who have been given religious teaching, "especially exposure to miracle stories, leads children to a more generic receptivity toward the impossible that is, a more wide-ranging acceptance that the impossible can happen in defiance of ordinary causal relations."

Cartoonist Bert Ring

News-Press Cartoon: Beyond the Yellow Brick Road

News-Press Cartoon: Beyond the Yellow Brick Road

Beware the bicyclists, cartoonist Bert Ring warns -- you never know who you'll come across!

Leader Cartoon: Beyond the Yellow Brick Road

Beware the bicyclists, cartoonist Bert Ring warns -- you never know who you'll encounter!

Leader Cartoon: A Crafty Situation

Who won't be shopping at Hobby Lobby, given the recent Supreme Court ruling that the craft store can opt out of covering certain contraceptives in its employees' medical insurance? Cartoonist Bert Ring takes a guess.

 

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